Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  DGarvey on Wed Oct 21, 2009 8:35 pm

Ok guys, construction and planning of the man cave is on going. Now I am researching keggerators. Now I am a bar drinker not a real keg drinker. I dont think I have even ever tapped a keg. But here is my questions. I am going to build a keggerator with a conversion kit. so here are my questions. I am not a big keg guy, how long does a keg last when I tap it and hook it up to the keggerator. My vision is to just be able to approach my fridge, grab the handle and pour. Do I still have to pump pressure into the keg to dispense. Does the CO2 make it dispense. Do i leave the CO2 vaulve on 24/7 to keep the beer carbinated. If I do convert an old fridge do I have to worry about any power/voltage issues or outlet issues. Also exscuse my spelling. Just got off work and I am typing in the dark, plus I am in the military if they wanted me to have a brain they would have issued me one. Thanks for the help.

DGarvey

Posts : 11
Join date : 2009-10-17

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  Admin on Thu Oct 22, 2009 7:44 am

DGarvey,

I'll give you my 2cents and let the other guys fill in the blanks. A keg will last up to 4 months in a keg-o-rator if hooked up to CO2 and kept cold. When you first tap the keg, it's been my experience to leave the CO2 off. The keg comes with enough pressure to pour the beer. Too much pressure and you get nothing but foam. drunken Once the beer starts to slow down at the tap turn on the CO2 but keep the pressure very low as if you put too much pressure...again lots of foam. Once the CO2 valve is on you can leave it on. A CO2 container (depending on size) can service 4-6 kegs (in our experience). There are no power issues. As long as the outlet can handle a standard refrigerator (as most can)...one with a safety breaker is best. BTW I'm retired military and I never got my brain either! Very Happy

Hope this helps.

Cave On!
Mike
avatar
Admin
Admin

Posts : 188
Join date : 2008-09-29

View user profile http://mancaveforum.forumotion.net

Back to top Go down

Keg beer

Post  bottieri on Thu Oct 22, 2009 11:38 am

https://www.kegman.net/informationtable.html

This is a good web site for keg info.

I once wrote to Bud for info on pressure and temperature. If I can find that email response I'll post it. In the mean time, I've gone through a lot of kegs in my lifetime, and here's what I found to be fact.

1. You must keep the pressure up or the beer goes flat (if I remember correctly it's 10 + psi) don't wait until it slows down pouring - it's too late then to recover the carbonation. (Sorry Mike!)
2. The pour pressure and control is regulated by the size and length of the hose (plastic pipe) from the keg valve to the spigot - not the gas pressure directly.
3. You must use special plastic pipe from a keg parts supplier
4. A large CO2 bottle lasts many full size kegs. I don't remember how many, but it should be around 20 or so.
5. Keep the temperature of the keg down to 36 to 38 or so. I kept mine as cold as possible and still used frozen mugs.
6. There should be a fan in the cooler so the air circulates and keeps the entire keg the same temperature
7. Do not use the made in China spigot - it doesn't pour correctly
8. Store your mugs in a freezer.
9. Remember to clean the lines and valves every time you change kegs (or at least monthly if you don't consume it as fast as I did). drunken If it last you 4 months, the beer will lose flavor as it ages.
10. Check the date on the keg when you buy it. Most retail keg stores buy the old kegs from the beer distributor cheap and sell them for personal use. Bud puts the born date on the keg, Coors puts the best if used by date, not sure about the rest of the brewers. If the date tag is missing, I'd go elsewhere for my keg.

For you guys who buy bottled or canned (yuk) beer, check the date on the case before getting screwed by discount houses who buy the old or outdated stuff from the distributors.

Go to the link above and find all the answers you'll need regarding keg beer.

There's nothing better than a cold draught beer in a frosty mug! Very Happy
avatar
bottieri

Posts : 12
Join date : 2009-09-22
Location : Indian Harbour Beach, FL

View user profile http://web.me.com/bottieri/Bottieri/Index.html

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  Mike NZ on Fri Oct 23, 2009 3:38 am

Admin wrote: There are no power issues. As long as the outlet can handle a standard refrigerator (as most can)...one with a safety breaker is best.
Mike,
I'm not sure I agree with this bit of advice, as an electrician, I've seen a lot of older fridges and freezers trip GFCI units.
The reason this occurs, is because of leakage currents in the windings of the compressor in the refrigeration side of things, leaks enough current to ground, to trip the GFCI.
People have had some very rude shocks over here when they open the freezer and find it's been off for some time due to the GFCI tripping. Mad

Besides, as long as a fridge is properly grounded and the wiring feeding the fridge recept is up to Code, there is no reason why the fridge needs a GFCI on it.
I would limit this idea to fridges and freezers though, GFCI's are installed for a very good reason.

Just a thought.
avatar
Mike NZ

Posts : 5
Join date : 2009-09-29
Age : 47
Location : South Island, New Zealand

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  DGarvey on Fri Oct 23, 2009 10:08 am

well to help me with this idea I went out and go smashed in a beer pong tourny and soon relized that I still dont know what I am doing lol. So here is what I am going to do. I am going to just plug the fridge up and see what happens lol. As to what mike said, how do I know if the fridge is grounded and how do I ground said fridge. Also thanks for the replys about the kerrerator guys, I hope to have pictures today.

DGarvey

Posts : 11
Join date : 2009-10-17

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  Mike NZ on Fri Oct 23, 2009 2:54 pm

DGarvey wrote:well to help me with this idea I went out and go smashed in a beer pong tourny and soon relized that I still dont know what I am doing lol. So here is what I am going to do. I am going to just plug the fridge up and see what happens lol. As to what mike said, how do I know if the fridge is grounded and how do I ground said fridge.
By rights Dave, the fridge should already be grounded, it is required by law, I would be very amazed if a fridge didn't have a ground conductor on it these days.
You will know if it is grounded by the fridge having a 3 pin plug on the end of the cord and if you look in the back of the fridge you should see a green wire screwed to the metal frame of the fridge. Smile
avatar
Mike NZ

Posts : 5
Join date : 2009-09-29
Age : 47
Location : South Island, New Zealand

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  earnhardtjunkie on Thu Oct 29, 2009 6:21 am

(copy and paste from www.berveragefactory.com )


Q: How long will a keg last?

A: There are a lot of opinions and facts out there on this topic. This is a general discussion on the topic and does not account for all circumstances and opinions. I'll start with some facts. Beer does not go bad…sort of! It only changes flavor. The 3 main components of spoilage are bacteria, oxygen, and temperature. The rate at which beer will spoil is dependent upon the combination of all three of these factors.

Let's start with Bacteria. It is everywhere. You can't get rid of it. There are good bacteria, ones that won't make you sick, and there are bad bacteria, the kind that will make you sick. Beer does not support bad bacteria. It does support good bacteria. Over time, these bacteria will grow and impart a flavor in the beer. For the most part, these flavors are undesirable. The unique aspect of beer is that it has a natural bacteria inhibitor - Alcohol.

Next is Oxygen. Oxygen has two negative effects on beer. It provides fuel for more bacteria and it oxidizes the beer…changing the flavor. Once Oxygen (air) is introduced into the keg, it has only days before the flavor has changed substantially. It also goes flat. When you use a hand pump or picnic pump on a keg, the keg is pretty much done within 48 hours.

Finally there is Temperature. Temperature will inhibit or accelerate the growth of bacteria. The colder the beer, the slower the growth. The hotter the beer, the faster the growth.

What does it all mean? It means if you keep your beer cold, use Co2, not air to drive the beer, you keep the dispensing system clean, and you buy kegs from breweries that have strict sanitizing and cleaning procedures, you're keg will last 4 months or more with minimal or no noticeable flavor change.

If you keep your kegs warm, and drive them with Co2 through a jockey box or other faucet, they will most likely last a couple of months. Just be sure to clean your lines after every keg.


Q: How many beers are in a 1/2 barrel keg?

A:
1 barrel of beer=31 gallons.
1/2 Barrel=15.5 Gallons or 1984 Fluid Ounces.
1/4 Barrel=7.75 Gallons or 992 Fluid Ounces.
There are 128 oz. in 1 gallon.
124 Pints 16-oz. glasses
165 12-oz. glasses
198 10-oz. glasses


Q: What is the ideal beer temperature?

A: Temperature is a key factory in storing and dispensing draught beer. Beer can freeze at 28°F, so it is important to select and maintain proper operating temperatures inside the refrigerator cabinet. Optimum temperatures for serving cold beer are 34°-38° F (1°-3° C).


Q: What pressure should I run my CO2 regulator?

A: You should monitor the pressure regulators to ensure applied operating pressures remain constant (10-12psi/lbs).


Q: How important a role does a clean beer glass play?

A: Keeping your glassware clean is the key to serving good draught beer. To achieve this:

-Maintain strict sanitary conditions in the glass washing area
-Never wash glassware with utensils or dishes used to serve food. Food particles and/or residue can effect the quality/taste of draught beer
-Do no use regular liquid household dish washing detergents for glassware. They are fat-based and will leave a slight oily film on the glass. This causes beer to go flat quickly. Use a detergent designed specifically for beer glass cleaning. It must be low-suds, odor-free and non-fat.
-Avoid drying glassware with towels as they tend to leave traces of lint on the surface of the glass
-We recommend that you use beer glassware only for beer. Dairy and other food products leave a residue which can effect the quality/taste of the draught.


Q: What are the causes of cloudy beer?

A: You can tell you have cloudy beer when the beer in the glass appears hazy, not clear. It can be caused by the following:

-Frozen or nearly frozen beer
-Old beer
-Beer that has been unrefrigerated for long periods of time
-Dirty glass
-Dirty faucet
-Unrefrigerated foods placed on top of cold keg
-Contaminated air source


Q: What are the causes of flat beer?

A: You can tell you have flat beer when the foamy head disappears quickly and the beer lacks usual zestful brewery fresh flavor. It can be caused by the following:

-Dirty glasses
-Sluggish regulator
-Applied pressure is set too low
-CO2 is turned off at night
-Contaminated air source (associated with compressed air)
-Moisture in air system
-Beer too cold
-Loose tap or vent connections


Q: What are the causes of foamy beer?

A: You can tell you have wild beer when the drawn beer is all foam, or too much foam and not enough liquid beer is present. It can be caused by the following:

-Beer drawn improperly
-Creeping regulator
-Applied pressure is set too high
-Hot spots in line
-Use of non-insulated beer line
-Beer runs are too long for proper cooling
-Tapped into a warm keg
-Cooler malfunctioning
-Kinks, dents, twists or other obstructions in line
-Faucets in bad, dirty or worn condition


Q: What are the causes of unpalatable beer?

A: You can tell you have unpalatable beer when the drawn beer has an off-taste. It can be caused by the following:

-Dirty or old beer lines
-Dirty faucet
-Contanimated air source, or unfiltered unsanitary bar conditions


Q: What are the causes of a false head?

A: False head appears as large soap-like bubbles and the head dissolves very quickly. It can be caused by the following:

-Applied pressure required does not correspond to beer temperature
-Small beer line into a large faucet shank
-Beer lines warmer than beer keg
-Dry glasses
-Improper pour
avatar
earnhardtjunkie

Posts : 52
Join date : 2008-09-30
Location : Sierra Vista, Arizona

View user profile http://www.butterfieldphotos.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Beer,Kegs,Keggerators

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum